25 Ideal Plants for Your Yoga Studio

You should definitely get some plants for your yoga studio. Read why plus check out this short list of 25 ideal plants for your yoga studio space.

Philodendron, one of 6 excellent plants for a yoga studio.

When you’re thinking about creating a perfect studio for your clients, you’re going to be taking a lot of things into consideration: lighting, design, ambiance. But have you considered plants?

Plants have lots of amazing benefits independent of yoga, but those benefits can add a lot to a studio: they increase mood, they can help heal the body (really!), and some plants can also clean the air, which can make a pretty big difference in how people feel as they practice in your studio.

So, as you think about designing (or re-designing) your studio, consider the following awesome plants.

A few things to note before we get into specific indoor plants. Generally, leafy plants are more effective in air purification. A quick example: ferns have a better surface area, which is important in air purification. Ferns have ruffled leaves, which increase the surface area available for gas conversion. The many small leaves also contribute to increasing the surface area. The following are the other plants you might need to consider for your yoga studio.

What characteristics make for great plants in a yoga studio?

When it comes to choosing the most appropriate and appealing plants to grow in a yoga studio, there are several factors to consider.

Size And Space

No matter how much space you have in your studio, you can find the right plants to fit your needs. Containers for indoor gardening come in sizes as small as a teacup that will fit on a desk or shelf to as big as a barrel that takes up an entire corner of a room. If you have low or no sunlight in your studio, you can choose plants that need very little or that respond well to inexpensive grow lights.

Maintenance And Care

You don’t need to be a master gardener to successfully grow plants inside your yoga studio, but it is important to select plants that match your studio’s environment and the time and effort you can put into their care. Fortunately, there are many plants that do well with minimal water and just a little supervision, especially succulent varieties.

Aesthetic Appeal

The aromatic qualities of many plants and their flowers have been linked to positive mood improvement and memory-building brain activity. While an overpoweringly perfumed scent may not be a good fit for the calm, relaxing feel of a yoga studio, there are still many flowering houseplants that impart a gently pleasant aroma to a room.

Impact On Air Quality

Many houseplants became popular for their impressive ability to filter toxins from the air , which is one of the most important characteristics in plants for a yoga studio. With breath work being such an important component of yoga exercise, purified air inside the studio is a must.

Tradition and Folklore

Historically, many plants that were adapted to grow indoors were chosen because of their mythological or medicinal properties. Certain herbs still make delicious additions to any tea or fresh water you may enjoy in between sessions in the studio, and it doesn’t hurt to keep a few traditional symbolic luck plants hanging around.

On to the Plants!

25 great plants for yoga studios

1. Areca palm (Dipsus lutescens)

Areca Palm

Areca Palm

The areca plant, also called the “butterfly palm,” is a somewhat vase-shaped upright houseplant. The plant can grow to around 10-12 feet in height.

To avoid tip damages, you have to ensure that the area is humid. When choosing the plant, select those with large caliber trunks, particularly at the base. A plant with pencil thin stem will topple over and will be hard to maintain.

2. Lady Palm (Rhapis excela)

Lady Palm

Lady Palm

When searching for the best plants for your yoga studio, you should not forget about the Lady Palm, known as Rhapis Excels.

The Rhapis are among the easiest palms you can grow. However, each species requires a particular culture and environment. Even though the Lady Palm grows slowly, it can grow to around 14 feet in height. The plants will mostly have broad clumps and can have a diameter equal to its height.

3. Bamboo Palm (Chamaedorea)

Bamboo Palm

Bamboo Palm

Also known as the reed palm, bamboo palm prefers bright (indirect) light. While your new plants acclimate to the indoor setting of your yoga studio, they will lose some foliage.

The plant remains uniformly moist but you should not over-water it. Again, ensure that it is not sitting in stagnating water. The plant easily attracts spider mites, which you can control by spraying soapy solutions.

4. Rubber Plant (Ficus elastica)

Rubber Plant

Rubber Plant

The rubber plant grows well indoors – it prefers semi-sun lighting. Ensure that direct sunlight is not reaching the plant, particularly during summer. You might need to support the young plants by stakes.

The plant will grow to around 8 feet and can spread to around 5 feet. When pruning, wear groves mainly because the milky sap can irritate your skin. When the plant is in active growth, you should water thoroughly. Always ensure that the soil is dry before you start watering again. During winter, keep the soil slightly moist.

5. Dracaena “Janet Craig” (Dracaena mariginata)

Dracaena

Dracaena

The Dracaena “Janet Craig” can grow to around 10 feet with a spread exceeding 3 feet. The plant is also among the easiest plants to grow. To grow properly, it requires bright indirect sunlight – which should come from east/west.

Whenever you reduce the watering, the Dracaena will adapt to lower light level. Ensure that you are keeping the soil moist. Moreover, you have to mist the plant frequently with some warm water. Remove every dead leaf and any browning tip. Under watering of the plant will lead to browning of the leaf tips.

6. Philodendron (Philodendron bipinnatifidum)

Philodendron

Philodendron

Did you know that the philodendron is among the most durable houseplants?

The plant prefers medium intensity light. However, it will tolerate lower light. Any direct sun will damage the leaves and even stunt the growth. When shopping for the plant, remember that you have two options.

You can either select the climbing on non-climbing variety. You will need to mist the plant regularly and ensure that the leaves are free from any dust. Ensure that the soil is evenly moist – you can allow it to dry in between watering.

7. Dwarf Date Palm (Phoenix roebelenii)

Dwarf Date Palm

Dwarf Date Palm

Indoor gardeners love this plant because it’s so easy to maintain and thrives well in a container. It grows slowly so there’s no need to prune it constantly. Choose this plant if you have a spacious corner with a bit of sunlight.

8. Peace Lily (Spathiphyllum wallisii)

Peace Lily

Peace Lily

These indoor favorites have been known to thrive even in fluorescent-only light, so they’re a great fit for studio rooms without windows. Their waxy leaves and bold blooms are not only pleasing to the eye, but they keep your studio’s air clear of toxins like benzene and formaldehyde.

9. Ponytail Palm (Beaucarnea recurvata)

Ponytail Palm

Ponytail Palm

This member of the succulent family looks like a small palm with long, hair-like fronds, which is where it gets its name. Because it grows easily with just a little water and attention, it’s a favorite for bonsai artists and container gardeners. It tolerates low light but needs bright light if you want it to grow tall and quickly.

10. Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis)

Rosemary

Rosemary

Not only is rosemary a popular culinary herb, but it has long been used as a decorative plant for topiaries and hedges. Whether you grow it in a small or large container, rosemary’s aromatic properties and symbol as a good luck charm mean it’s a great addition to your studio. It may need a good light source to flourish best.

11. Boston Fern (Nephrolepis exaltata bostoniensis)

Boston Fern

Boston Fern

This fern is easily recognizable as one of the most common indoor plants used to decorate homes and offices, and potentially your yoga studio space. Ferns are wonderfully efficient plants that purify the air, need only indirect sunlight, and thrive easily with minimal fuss.

12. Ficus Alii (Ficus macleilandii)

Ficus Alii

Ficus Alii

Ficus trees are popular indoor options that add height and eye-catching appeal to any space. This Hawaiian native, whose name translates to “king”, tolerates minor inconsistencies very well. Unlike other members of its family, it doesn’t shed often and it can stand up to being shifted around without wilting from shock when you’re cleaning or redecorating.

13. African Violet (Saintpaulia ionantha)

African Violet

African Violet

With its history of symbolizing virtues like devotion and faithfulness, choosing the African Violet for a yoga studio will subtly encourage everyone to stay mindful and focus their intentions on positive goals. It’s also an easy plant to keep potted and indoors, as well as adding lovely touches of color when its clustered flowers bloom.

14. Mood Moss (Dicranum scoparium)

Mood Moss

Mood Moss

While moss usually shows up as decoration at the base of other plants with friendly conditions, many moss species can be used to create stunning gardenscapes on their own. Terrariums are an easy way to show off this lush plant, but a moss wall feature is even more impressive and fitting for a yoga studio aesthetic.

15. Aloe Vera (Aloe barbadensis)

Aloe Vera

Aloe Vera

The aloe plant’s status as a healing aid is legendary, so it’s a perfect fit for the wellness philosophy of yoga. Not only can the plant’s sap act as an ointment, but it’s a powerful air purifier. It’s also incredibly easy to grow indoors and requires very little attention to thrive properly.

16. Snake Plants (Sansevieria trifasciata)

Snake Plants

Snake Plants

With their striking deep green mottling hemmed in bright yellow, the snake plant’s sturdy, upright leaves offer any indoor area a dynamic look. They clean the air of toxins and grow so easily that experienced gardeners believe the plant does best when left to its own devices. They favor indirect light, so they don’t need window space to grow well.

17. Chinese Evergreen (Aglaonema commutatum)

Chinese Evergreen

Chinese Evergreen

As a fan of low-light conditions and minimal fuss, the Chinese evergreen is an easy favorite for many indoor plant enthusiasts. When in bloom, its flowers look much like a Peace Lily’s blossom, so they pair well together as a decorative theme. In Asia, these plants are kept for their association with good luck–and as another air purification champ, they undoubtedly improve any space they’re in.

18. Hindu Rope Plant (Hoya compacta)

Hindu Rope Plant

Hindu Rope Plant

This succulent, trailing vine looks best in hanging baskets and planters so that its tightly bunched and curly leaves have a chance to showcase their impressive quality and maximize their ability to remove pollutants from the air. Not only is its lushness a pleasant addition to the studio, but the plant and the practice of yoga also share India as a home of origin.

19. Chinese Jade Plant (Crassula ovata)

Chinese Jade Plant

Chinese Jade Plant

The jade plant is a popular choice for people who worry that they’re unable to care for any plant properly. Its incredibly resilient nature has long been associated with imparting luck and good fortune and is known as the Money Plant. It can also be grown in small bunches or in a large container, so it’s a versatile choice for studios of every size.

20. Decorative Pepper (Peperomia obtusifolia)

Decorative Pepper

Decorative Pepper

As another pollutant combatant, this plant suits the conditions of indoor gardening very well. The more it thrives, the better job it does of purifying the air, so choose this plant if you’re able to maintain its minimal needs for water and pruning. The multi-colored leaves also add a unique pop to the room.

21. Asparagus Fern (Asparagus aethiopicus)

Asparagus Fern

Asparagus Fern

The uniquely soft look of this plant’s long stems and small, needle-shaped leaves pairs well with plants that have thicker or waxy-looking foliage. It grows in a delicate, bushy mound before the stalks begin to trail, but it can be trained to grow in a tight, dense shape by pinching back the tips of its stems. Add variety to the look of your studio’s indoor garden with this plant.

22. Lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus)

Lemongrass

Lemongrass

These versatile, easy-to-grow stalks show up in the kitchen for culinary delight as often as they do indoors for display. They impart a citrusy flavor to dishes and can be steeped alone as a soothing and delicious tea. Plants that have edible qualities are great choices for yoga studios where students and teachers may take breaks or have events that need some simple, all-natural refreshments.

23. Zebra Plant (Aphelandra squarrosa)

Zebra Plant

Zebra Plant

As a common houseplant, the Zebra plant may need more attention than its peers, but the payoff is the bright contrast of white and green in its leaves and bold yellow flowers with brilliant red tips. Its vibrant beauty makes it a popular choice, and yogis with green thumbs will enjoy how well its leaves and large flowers compliment their studio’s space.

24. Spearmint (Mentha spicata)

Spearmint

Spearmint

Mint plants like spearmint prefer partial shade, but when the sun hits their leaves, their aromatic qualities can fill the air, which can help a yoga studio’s space smell fresh. As a hardy and an edible herb, they are wonderful additions to indoor spaces because of their easy care requirements and the added benefit of being able to pinch a few leaves to add to drinks and infusions.

25. Marino Blue Heliotrope (Heliotropium arborescens)

Marino Blue Heliotrope

Marino Blue Heliotrope

This beautiful, shrubby plant with deep green leaves and sweetly fragrant purple flowers love to turn towards the sun, thus the origin of its name. When kept indoors, they can manage well with partial shade, but benefit most from good sunlight or the help of a grow light. Their beautiful appearance and an aroma that’s described as having cherry, almond and vanilla notes make them a wonderful addition to a yoga studio.

Calming colors on the walls of your yoga studio can bring a sense of peace and encourage your clients to relax when starting exercises. Ensure that the yoga studio is as natural as possible. In my opinion, the more plants you include the better!





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